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Getting vaccinated should not be a political litmus test | READER COMMENTARY

In this July 15, 2021, file photo, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaks during a town hall meeting in Texarkana, Ark. Facing growing vaccine hesitancy, governors in states hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic are asking federal regulators to grant full approval to the shots in the hope that will persuade more people to get them. (Kelsi Brinkmeyer/The Texarkana Gazette via AP, File)
In this July 15, 2021, file photo, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaks during a town hall meeting in Texarkana, Ark. Facing growing vaccine hesitancy, governors in states hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic are asking federal regulators to grant full approval to the shots in the hope that will persuade more people to get them. (Kelsi Brinkmeyer/The Texarkana Gazette via AP, File) (Kelsi Brinkmeyer/AP)

Famous last words: “There are no bears in these woods.” “What does this button do?” “I don’t believe in COVID-19, it’s just a cold.”

These are three statements that could well be a prelude to disaster.

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How did we ever get to this place? How could a clear, unambiguous medical procedure be turned into a political statement? We heard recently that about 95% of people hospitalized with COVID are unvaccinated. Somehow, despite their leader having gotten his shots months ago, his followers reject medical help, seeing that as some kind of badge of honor (”A conservative radio host who dismissed vaccines changes his message after being hospitalized with COVID-19,” July 26).

Imagine if 95% of people getting the shots became ill or died. There would be no question as to whether to get them or not. But when its turned around and the overwhelming number of folks winding up in the hospital have not gotten the shots, the obvious solution to the problem is rejected.

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We live in a diverse country with just about every political view imaginable espoused somewhere in the population. But health care is not political. You could get sick and even die regardless of your politics. The virus doesn’t care. But that could be avoided with a simple shot.

“No thanks, I’ll take my chances,” is the unfathomable response of many of the political hard right. It’s even free! Why, for heavens sake, would anyone of sound mind reject this panacea? Maybe the answer is revealed in the question.

Sig Seidenman, Owings Mills

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