xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

U.S. needs a standardized national election system | READER COMMENTARY

Officials tabulate the results of an initial head count at a caucus site in Des Moines on Feb. 3, 2020.
Officials tabulate the results of an initial head count at a caucus site in Des Moines on Feb. 3, 2020.(Jordan Gale/The New York Times)

In his commentary piece, “Iowa wields too much influence on Dem nominee for president" (Feb. 5), Terry Lierman addresses the absurdity of the Iowa caucus system.

The office of the president is a national office, and he or she is elected to serve the entire country. Therefore, the federal government should specify the rules for the presidential election, not the individual states. The primary election for the president should be held on the same day in all 50 states (to include early voting and absentee ballots) for both Democrats and Republicans and decided by the popular vote of citizens of the entire country. One person, one vote.

Advertisement

U.S. senators and representatives, however, are elected by each state to serve the interests of that state. Therefore, each state should retain the privilege of electing its member of Congress any way it chooses. Most of what Mr. Lierman said in his commentary applies equally well to the Electoral College. It’s time to get rid of that obsolete system also.

Bernard Bartos, Ellicott City

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement