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Is Trump president or the fifth Marx brother? | READER COMMENTARY

President Donald Trump takes the stage for his campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla., June 20, 2020. Two Trump campaign staff members who attended the rally on Saturday night tested positive for the coronavirus, a spokesman said Monday, despite earlier assurances that a small outbreak among campaign workers had been contained.
President Donald Trump takes the stage for his campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla., June 20, 2020. Two Trump campaign staff members who attended the rally on Saturday night tested positive for the coronavirus, a spokesman said Monday, despite earlier assurances that a small outbreak among campaign workers had been contained. (Doug Mills/The New York Times)

"Doctor, please help me, it hurts when cough."

“So, don’t cough.”

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When “Dr. Kronkheit” dispensed his advice in a Smith and Dale vaudeville sketch over a hundred years ago, it brought a laugh due to the absurdity of the advice.

Equally absurd is President Donald Trump’s solution to the problem of the disease raging throughout the world (”Watch live: Dr. Anthony Fauci optimistic about COVID-19 vaccine, he and health officials say Trump didn’t ask to slow down testing,” June 23).

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“Mr. President, the more we test, the more people we find sick with this virus.”

“So don’t test so much.”

It is a revealing response. In it, he demonstrates his lack of concern for anyone not named Donald J. Trump and his determination to win reelection at any cost.

Clearly, having people dying of a disease for which we have no cure at present, is not a good look for a president. His current strategy is to make believe that the disease doesn’t exist. He seems to have convinced some of his die-hard followers that this is the case, as was demonstrated at his recent campaign rally in Oklahoma. The attendance was well below his expectations, but far higher than safety would demand.

He seems not to know which way to turn. The old bluster and rain of insults are still in evidence, but are no longer working. He is a living, breathing example of why there are erasers on pencils.

Sig Seidenman, Owings Mills

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