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Trump is not completely wrong on Syria

U.S. President Donald Trump listens to a question from a reporter at an event for the signing of two executive orders aimed at greater governmental transparency at the White House in Washington, DC. Mr. Trump answered questions on the pending impeachment inquiry and the Turkish offensive into northern Syria following the signing of the executive orders.
U.S. President Donald Trump listens to a question from a reporter at an event for the signing of two executive orders aimed at greater governmental transparency at the White House in Washington, DC. Mr. Trump answered questions on the pending impeachment inquiry and the Turkish offensive into northern Syria following the signing of the executive orders. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Many people agree with President Donald Trump’s statement that we must stop endless wars. U.S. involvement in Iraq (President George Bush), Libya (President Barack Obama) and Syria (Mr. Obama) have produced nothing but suffering and death for local people and U.S. forces (“US pulling out of northern Syria; full withdrawal possible,” Oct. 14).

Of course, President Trump lacks the knowledge and focus to implement a policy even when he expresses appropriate instincts. The statements are intended to manipulate feelings rather than to make people safer.

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He grandly announced a pullout from Syria that was really only moving 50 soldiers a few miles. Then he announced a further pullout of 1,000 soldiers. He caved to Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, then threatened him with economic ruin. Then he sent 1,800 of our soldiers to Saudi Arabia. Tomorrow, will bring more random zigs and zags. (See “Syrian troops move north, setting up potential clash with Turkish forces,” Oct. 14).

I am also very distressed to hear members of both parties of Congress criticizing the very idea of withdrawal from Syria. The United States has no business putting armed forces in the region. We end up supporting corrupt regimes, and we harm many more people than we help. However, we should be able to withdraw our forces in a planned way without causing extreme harm to innocent civilians and to Kurdish fighters who were U. S. allies.

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Charlie Cooper, Baltimore

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