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Trump is lawless: Don’t enable him | READER COMMENTARY

A member of a pro-Trump mob shatters a window with his fist from inside the Capitol Building after breaking into it on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. A pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol, breaking windows and clashing with police officers. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.
A member of a pro-Trump mob shatters a window with his fist from inside the Capitol Building after breaking into it on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. A pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol, breaking windows and clashing with police officers. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. (Jon Cherry / Getty Images)

I am consistently fascinated by well-educated Baltimore Sun commentators who use scholarly language to make hypocritical arguments for the purpose of enabling our lawless president.

In his recent commentary, “Pardoning Trump would avoid turmoil” (Jan. 10), University of Baltimore School of Law Professor Kenneth Lasson offers us a “thoughtful course of action” to “pacify the entrenched partisan divides.” His thesis is that President-elect Joe Biden should preemptively pardon Donald Trump, believing that this will “assure his supporters that the outgoing president is not a target and help calm tensions.” How noble.

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As evidence, Mr. Lasson presents us with a list of previous presidential pardons. Unfortunately, his equivocating history lesson seems to do a particularly bad job of supporting his point. Bill Clinton’s pardon of wealthy donors is an example of why presidential pardon powers should be limited and require greater oversight. President Trump’s pardon of convicted killers (his words) is an illustration of why this privilege should be abolished altogether. Neither example suggests that pardoning Mr. Trump is in any way a good idea.

Curious that Mr. Lasson did not choose to include the pardon of Richard Nixon in his examples. Perhaps it’s because Mr. Nixon was pardoned by his unelected, hand-picked successor only after he had resigned his office and admitted his crimes. Even Mr. Lasson knows that there is absolutely no chance that Mr. Trump and his “culpable Cabinet and staff members” will ever take responsibility for any of their seemingly endless list of transgressions. Mr. Trump will certainly never admit to creating and feverishly spreading the Big Lie — that the election was diabolically stolen from him by shadowy forces. It is this abhorrent, baseless lie that Mr. Trump has unrelentingly used to attack our democracy, divide our country and personally enrich himself. This is the lie he would ultimately use to unleash a violent mob to physically attack the U.S. Capitol and the men and women sworn to protect it including Officer Brian D. Sicknick, who was murdered while defending his country.

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Mr. Trump does not deserve to be pardoned for his reckless and seditious actions. He deserves to be unconditionally repudiated by intelligent adults like you Professor Lasson.

Mitch Vitullo, Columbia

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