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Malaria drug may be a ‘Hail Mary’ but it’s probably worth a try for those with little to lose | READER COMMENTARY

This Monday, April 6, 2020, photo shows an arrangement of hydroxychloroquine pills in Las Vegas. President Donald Trump and his administration kept up their out-sized promotion Monday of an malaria drug not yet officially approved for fighting the new coronavirus, even though scientists say more testing is needed before it’s proven safe and effective against COVID-19. Trump trade adviser Peter Navarro championed hydroxychloroquine in television interviews a day after the president publicly put his faith in the medication to lessen the toll of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/John Locher)
This Monday, April 6, 2020, photo shows an arrangement of hydroxychloroquine pills in Las Vegas. President Donald Trump and his administration kept up their out-sized promotion Monday of an malaria drug not yet officially approved for fighting the new coronavirus, even though scientists say more testing is needed before it’s proven safe and effective against COVID-19. Trump trade adviser Peter Navarro championed hydroxychloroquine in television interviews a day after the president publicly put his faith in the medication to lessen the toll of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/John Locher) (John Locher/AP)

Though President Donald Trump speaks in long monotonous drones full of half-truths and lies, I believe when he says “What have you got to lose?” he is speaking of worst case scenarios (“Trump’s irresponsible endorsement of malaria drug for coronavirus treatment boils the blood,” April 6).

If I were being placed on a respirator with a four out of five (80%) chance of spending my last 14 days of life unable to breathe, I would have no problem taking an experimental drug. Though many “Hail Mary” passes go incomplete, there are enough examples of last second miracles that make them worthwhile.

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Steven Davidson, New Windsor

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