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Sun finally has a good idea: hire army of trash collectors | READER COMMENTARY

Erica Bloom, deputy director of Jewish Volunteer Connection, hands down a tire dumped in Hebrew Friendship Cemetery to Ross Goldstein and his son, Bram Goldstein, right. Ten volunteers from JVC cleaned up trash around the perimeter of the East Baltimore cemetery for the annual Good Deeds Day. Other volunteers helping, from left, are brothers Noah and Micah Bloom, and Susanna Garfein. April 7, 2021. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun).
Erica Bloom, deputy director of Jewish Volunteer Connection, hands down a tire dumped in Hebrew Friendship Cemetery to Ross Goldstein and his son, Bram Goldstein, right. Ten volunteers from JVC cleaned up trash around the perimeter of the East Baltimore cemetery for the annual Good Deeds Day. Other volunteers helping, from left, are brothers Noah and Micah Bloom, and Susanna Garfein. April 7, 2021. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun). (Amy Davis)

I do not agree with many of your editorials, but your suggestion about enlisting a Civilian Conservation Corps-like army to address the citywide problem of trash is nothing less than brilliant (”Cleaning up one neighborhood is good. Cleaning up all of Baltimore — while creating lots of jobs — is much better,” April 13). I was not aware of New York City’s efforts, but you were and that’s what counts.

There would be no shortage of takers at $15 an hour and — guess what — when a neighborhood gets clean with the help of the hired help and the local neighborhood association, then maybe it stays clean.

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Well done. Hopefully, Mayor Brandon Scott agrees.

Joseph A. Schwartz III, Towson

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