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Baltimore’s most distressed neighborhoods should have free transit | READER COMMENTARY

Ellen Gee of Baltimore Ceasefire participates in a "sacred space" ritual near where a person was recently murdered on July 28, 2019 in Baltimore. Members of the activist group got to the scenes of murders to pray, burn sage and to create a "sacred space" for the victim.
Ellen Gee of Baltimore Ceasefire participates in a "sacred space" ritual near where a person was recently murdered on July 28, 2019 in Baltimore. Members of the activist group got to the scenes of murders to pray, burn sage and to create a "sacred space" for the victim. (Spencer Platt/Getty)

A recent front page article highlighted the appalling news that summer temperatures are 6 degrees hotter than the citywide average in the “redlined" areas of the city (those places financial institutions viewed as “hazardous” for investments) (”Summer is hotter in Baltimore neighborhoods that have seen racial ‘redlining.’ And the difference is more extreme here," Jan. 16). The back page of the same section had an article touting free public transit in some far-off municipalities around the globe. Why not make public transit free for those having to live in these benighted communities in Baltimore?

It should be easy enough to enforce. For instance, I receive a significantly reduced monthly pass by virtue of my appalling age but have to carry an ID that proves that. Chiding investors to make commitments to areas they have traditionally avoided is probably a fool’s errand. But the least that could be done would be to level the playing field somewhat so that people living in incredible poverty and summer heat should be able to get about with the same ease as single vehicle commuters.

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Paul R. Schlitz Jr., Baltimore

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