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Top-two system would disadvantage GOP candidates | READER COMMENTARY

In this Saturday, Jan. 25, 2020, photo, former Mayor Sheila Dixon answers a question during a Baltimore mayoral candidates forum hosted by the Greater Baltimore Urban League, at Morgan State University. She is now the leading candidate to serve as the city's next mayor. (Ulysses Muñoz/The Baltimore Sun via AP)
In this Saturday, Jan. 25, 2020, photo, former Mayor Sheila Dixon answers a question during a Baltimore mayoral candidates forum hosted by the Greater Baltimore Urban League, at Morgan State University. She is now the leading candidate to serve as the city's next mayor. (Ulysses Muñoz/The Baltimore Sun via AP) (Ulysses Muñoz/AP)

The editorial board thinks we should have an open primary for mayor and let the top two finishers face off in the general election (“Baltimore mayor’s race shows why ‘top two’ is the better way,” June 3). There is only one problem with that scenario. There would never be a Republican candidate.

With the high density of Democratic voters in the city (and the state), a Republican would never garner enough votes to finish in the top 10. Although a Republican’s chances are slim of winning the general, at least now people still have that choice. And sometimes having that choice leads to a Republican getting elected in a highly Democratic district.

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The editorial board’s idea would insure that only Democrats get elected, which has already been the case for four decades. Republicans still have a chance to win in the general. Don’t take that away. Sometimes the best choice is in the other party. Gov. Larry Hogan is a good example.

Dudley Thompson, Girdletree

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