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Why did the legal system go easy on DUI suspect?

Crash team investigators were on Girdwood Road at the intersection of Londonderry Road where a DUI driver is alleged to have killed a woman and a child.
Crash team investigators were on Girdwood Road at the intersection of Londonderry Road where a DUI driver is alleged to have killed a woman and a child. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)

Talia Richman’s sad report on Calia Noble Schwarzman (“Woman accused of DUI in fatal Baltimore County crash had been ordered to ‘totally abstain’ from alcohol, drugs,” July 28) who is accused of running down and killing beautiful 5-year-old Delaney Gaddis and her grandmother, 60-year-old Deborah Limmer, reveals disturbing details about our judiciary's decisions.

Here are the important details from the article: First, the 22-year-old Ms. Schwarzman was still under “supervised" probation from a 2017 DUI arrest at the time of the fatal accident. She was charged for a second time in February 2018 with failing to stop after an accident, driving on a suspended license and other counts. Her trial was scheduled for June 19 (three months later), but she didn’t show up to court.

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Secondly, she was arrested on July 10 regarding the outstanding warrant but was released on her own recognizance the following day. Ms. Schwarzman admitted to smoking marijuana, drinking alcohol and taking a Percocet tablet on Sunday night, July 22. On Monday morning of July 23, Delaney and Deborah were slaughtered.

How could a judge blindly release this ticking time-bomb on her own “recognizance" after her outrageous disregard for the law and repeated unreliable, destructive behavior? The judiciary needs to be held accountable for their deadly decisions with impeachment proceedings post-haste.

Geary Foertsch, Rehoboth Beach, Del.

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