xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Baltimore would benefit from free legal aid to tenants | READER COMMENTARY

A religious statue stands outside the boarded building at 16 S. Patterson Park Avenue were 27 people were evicted in 2017. Such actions have been suspended during the coronavirus outbreak but providing free legal advice to tenants facing eviction might prove beneficial, according to a recent study. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun.
A religious statue stands outside the boarded building at 16 S. Patterson Park Avenue were 27 people were evicted in 2017. Such actions have been suspended during the coronavirus outbreak but providing free legal advice to tenants facing eviction might prove beneficial, according to a recent study. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun.(Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)

I am writing today on behalf of housing providers in Baltimore and from throughout the state regarding the study that came out highlighting the need to provide free legal support to tenants facing evictions (“Study: Legal aid evictions saves money," May 19). The legal system can be confusing and stressful for litigants even without the occurrence of a global pandemic.

The Maryland Multi-Housing Association and our members support a right to counsel, at public expense, for all self-represented litigants in eviction proceedings including residents and small landlords. We understand that while some cities have successfully employed such a program, others have not. Stakeholders should collectively learn from these jurisdictions and MMHA looks forward to engaging further in the discussion.

Advertisement

Adam Skolnik, Owings Mills

The writer is executive director of the Maryland Multi-Housing Association.

Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement