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Don't send message that teen sexual assault is OK

President Trump appeared to side with Brett Kavanaugh and dispute the claims by a woman who says the Supreme Court nominee sexually assaulted her in the 1980s.

Does anyone see the error in the argument that Brett Kavanaugh was just a teenager when this alleged sexual assault occurred? By using this argument, you are then excusing any and all teenage boys of the same behavior. Do youth, liquor and hormones make this behavior right (“An alt-right Twitter account leaked the address of Kavanaugh’s accuser. It’s not the first time,” Sept. 18)?

Yes, this is a "he said, she said" situation especially since this occurred over 30 years ago. But we cannot dismiss why this allegation should be taken seriously. Judge Kavanaugh, if confirmed, will hold a lifetime appointment and could possibly be ruling on issues for at least the next 30 years or even longer. Many of these issues could affect women. An investigation could possibly bring to light other possible behaviors. I know the FBI already did several background checks, but don't forget how long it took Harvey Weinstein's numerous accusers to come forward and then it took Ronan Farrow's article to give them the courage to come out. In Bill Cosby's case, it took over 20 years for many of the woman to come forward.

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Sexual assault is a traumatic experience. Until recently, the woman has been viewed as the one who initiates the incident. It may have been a subtle attitude, but it existed. Think about it: how would a young teenage girl feel after such an attack? Professor Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations do have a couple of points that make them credible. This not the first time she has brought up the allegations. In 2012, she told a therapist about the incident. And she did name a witness. Naturally, that witness has denied being there.

We need to have the FBI to do one more investigation. Because of the statute of limitations, this could not result in criminal charges, but instead bring forth information that could shed light on a possible lifetime office holder's character and behavior. The American public has a right to all the information on someone who could affect their lives for a long time to come.

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Michelle Peyton, Havre de Grace

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