xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Tax bill's benefits are strictly for the wealthy

I read Thomas J. Snyder’s letter with great interest as I am livid that the general public does not get the fact that the Republican tax bill is nothing more than yet another version of “trickle down” economics — providing billions of dollars of tax breaks for the richest people in hopes they will spend it and create jobs for the rest of us (“Andy Harris is no friend of the middle class,” Nov. 17).

They have totally avoided that term “trickle down,” as it has grown great negative connotations since we know that it didn’t work for Ronald Reagan, it didn’t work for George W. Bush, and it won’t work for Donald Trump. It is economically sound reasoning in a normal world, which is why Sen. Orrin Hatch got so emotional over it (“Sen. Hatch to Dems saying tax cuts are for rich: ‘Bull crap,’” Nov. 19). He actually believes his own rhetoric. The truth be told, in a highly partisan career politician government where everyone can be bought by the highest bidder and the need to protect and grow ones base to justify their own existence, it is impossible not to spend any benefit before it happens. Thus killing any soundness to the logic.

Advertisement

In looking at the Maryland map, the 1st Congressional District does not seem to be the wealthiest in the state, which makes me wonder why Mr. Snyder’s letter wasn’t directed to the middle class citizens of that district. Fortunately, we get to elect representatives every two years and now is the time to start looking for a replacement for Rep. Andy Harris. I’m guessing it would be too much to ask for a moderate Democrat. However, a moderate Republican in the mold of Gov. Larry Hogan would not be asking too much. Actually, running both against Mr. Harris would give the state a double chance or ridding us of him.

The con men in the Republican Party keep harping on this as a tax cut for the middle class, as most voters are uneducated and can be programmed into thinking this bill is good for them if they keep repeating it often enough. Not only is the change to tax write-offs bad, a great many Marylanders tithe, which is made easier with the charitable deduction. The religious institutions in Maryland stand to lose a great deal with the loss of the ability to deduct this generosity. This new bill purports to be making up for the loss of the ability to deduct by raising the already woefully low exemption amount to a still low level, marginally reducing the tax bracket if you are lucky enough and killing seniors by removing the exemptions for age 65 and blindness.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Steven Davidson, New Windsor

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement