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Lawmakers fail math: 1 doesn't equal 9

Governor of Maryland Larry Hogan talks about a bill that he is introducing for Maryland tax payers in response to the new federal tax plan. (Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun video)

Annapolis, all political stripes united, decided to retain $200 million of a tax windfall for education (“Despite assurances, 9 percent of Maryland taxpayers are likely to pay more for 2018,” March 27). Considering Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller’s assertion that “We are not here to reward corporations nor the upper 1 percent,” how is it that 9 percent of Marylanders won’t see tax relief?

How 1 percent became 9 percent is a problem that more math class will help solve! Translation: one out of 10 taxpayers will be subject to a stealth tax increase. This not what Gov. Larry Hogan wanted, this not what the legislature should do unless prepared to face the law of unintended consequences such as taxpayer revolt in high property tax areas, increased difficulties to attract and retain professionals in high tax Baltimore City, and ballot box upsets in November.

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Nine percent is a number large enough to sway elections. Being part on the 9 percent, at the ballot box, I shall remember the vote taken by my delegates and senator. Perhaps others should, too.

Jean-Luc Renaux, Baltimore

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