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Removing statues may do more harm than good | READER COMMENTARY

A statue of Roger Brooke Taney, the former U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the infamous Dred Scott decision, that was removed from the State House lawn more than two years ago. Now, there's move to remove a bust of the Marylander from the U.S. Capitol.
A statue of Roger Brooke Taney, the former U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the infamous Dred Scott decision, that was removed from the State House lawn more than two years ago. Now, there's move to remove a bust of the Marylander from the U.S. Capitol. (By Matthew Cole / Capital Gazette)

Removing monuments that symbolize past evils might seem to be the right thing to do, but let’s consider the motives for this “noble” action (“Historic swap? Bill would replace bust of Dred Scott decision author at Capitol with one of Thurgood Marshall,” March 9). To the people pursuing this, do you really believe our generation is any better? Ethically? Politically? Morally? Spiritually? I have my doubts.

Should we pursue goodness today? Yes. Should we try to blot out the evils of yesterday? No. History is to be remembered, not forgotten. We must remember the evil as well as the good, for the obvious reasons. All of us have in us the potential for doing good and the potential for doing evil. Welcome to the human race.

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Let’s not let arrogance remove symbols that could remind us of roads to avoid.

Richard H. Anderson, Jarrettsville

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