xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Student gun violence protests deserved bigger Sun coverage

Emma Gonzalez, one of the student leaders of the #NeverAgain movement, stood in silence for more than six minutes in honor of the Parkland shooting victims during the March for Our Lives rally on Saturday in Washington, D.C.

I question the editorial judgment used in the layout and content of the Sunday, March 25th front page. Baltimore is mired in gun violence, and young people are being killed every day, a fact The Sun has covered repeatedly and which is known worldwide. Five days ago, two students were killed in a school shooting in St. Mary's County. On Saturday, the students of this city took to the streets of Washington, D.C. and, along with students from St. Mary's County, Parkland, Fla., Newtown, Conn. and the rest of the United States, to say "Enough is enough" (“Three teens were shot in Baltimore on the same day youth rallied against gun violence in Washington,” March 26). Some 800 other demonstrations were held around the world, including one in Baltimore. Yet The Sun chooses to put that story beneath the fold and lead with an update on the as-yet unsolved death of Police Det. Sean Suitor. In case you don't already know this, rumors that it was a suicide are already old news.

The story on the “March For Our Lives” buries the lead (“Demonstrators channel anger, sadness over Florida and Maryland school shootings into calls for action,” March 24). Rather than focusing on what happened at the protest, the second paragraph attempts to describe the rally's place in history hours after the event. It is too soon to talk about the rally's place in history. The writers diminish the event by listing it as just another ho-hum rally that may or may not be effective to change laws. The only person quoted on the front page is a 78-year-old man who is in Atlanta!

Advertisement

I attended the march in D.C. Your front page completely misses the mark in describing what happened (who, what, when, where, and why). If The Sun wants to attract young readers, the editors and writers will have to at least pay attention to what these kids are saying and doing and give them the spotlight that they have earned in blood.

Janice Flynn

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement