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Forgiving student loans unfair to families that scrimped and saved | READER COMMENTARY

Masked students on the lawn at the Marquette University campus in Milwaukee, Wis. Democratic leaders are pressing the president-elect to cancel $50,000 in debt per student borrower by fast executive action, but he wants Congress to pass more modest relief.
Masked students on the lawn at the Marquette University campus in Milwaukee, Wis. Democratic leaders are pressing the president-elect to cancel $50,000 in debt per student borrower by fast executive action, but he wants Congress to pass more modest relief. (Taylor Glascock/The New York Times)

You have got to be kidding me. Congressional Democrats are pressing President-elect Joe Biden to forgive up to $50,000 in student loan debt on his first day in office (”Forgiveness could be costly,” Dec. 13). Really?

People who knowingly take on debt have a moral obligation to pay it back according to the terms of the loan. Period. Here’s a better idea: Before wiping out student loans — especially when some of that money is used by students who need to “find themselves” by studying semesters abroad — why not reimburse the honest, hardworking families who sacrificed and saved to come up with the money to send their children to college?

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Many found less costly ways to get a good education, such as starting in community colleges or living at home while commuting to local four-year schools to get a degree. Forgiving student loans starts a very dangerous precedent that this country simply cannot afford. It’s about time we put this bad idea out to pasture once and for all.

Gary N. Michael, Baldwin

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