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A major environmental project, the six-year restoration of Cattail Creek by the Berrywood community with help from the Magothy River Association was completed in 2019 on Earth Day. Seen here, neighborhood volunteers were planting a bio retention area above the stream bed with native trees, shrubs and deep rooted plants to retain storm water runoff.
A major environmental project, the six-year restoration of Cattail Creek by the Berrywood community with help from the Magothy River Association was completed in 2019 on Earth Day. Seen here, neighborhood volunteers were planting a bio retention area above the stream bed with native trees, shrubs and deep rooted plants to retain storm water runoff. (Sharon Lee Tegler)

The experts quoted in Scott Dance’s article on stream restoration wonder why some parts of urban streams erode and in general fail to improve water quality (“As Maryland pours millions of dollars into ailing streams, research shows some projects don’t help clean the bay,” Jan. 2). These projects were engineered with previous decades’ weather patterns in mind. Those are patterns that are completely irrelevant In the era of human-forced climate change. We are seeing intense storms that are unprecedented in modern time. Of course, the stream banks wash out!

There is currently a stream project planned a few yards from my backyard in Gwynns Falls Leakin Park. The city tells me workers will clear cut a 25-foot swath of forest in order to access the stream, then spray the area routinely with pesticides in order to ensure the area isn’t overtaken by invasive plants. This is being done, they tell me, to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. With this type of logic, it should surprise no one when these projects only succeed in wasting taxpayer money.

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Amy Stump, Baltimore

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