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STEM fields least likely to discriminate against women

Terra Miley, left, from Frances Scott Key High School, Claire Kettula, from South Carroll High School, participated in Exelon’s HeForShe STEM Innovation Leadership Academy. STEM programs aimed at girls are being challenged as discriminatory.
Terra Miley, left, from Frances Scott Key High School, Claire Kettula, from South Carroll High School, participated in Exelon’s HeForShe STEM Innovation Leadership Academy. STEM programs aimed at girls are being challenged as discriminatory. (Courtesy Photo)

Your editorial (“Women in STEM: Pendulum hasn’t swung nearly far enough,” Sept. 3) demonstrated that your editorial staff seems to look at all gender related issues from a purely political point of view. Your editorial also was obviously not informed by any particular knowledge of technical education (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics).

I am a holder of a Ph.D. in physics with more than 35 years of work experience in technical environments and I have never personally observed gender discrimination against women (though I have been discriminated against because I am male). Undoubtedly, women and others have been discriminated against for irrelevant reasons, but your statistics about the relative participation of women in STEM fields do not prove that such discrimination is rampant.

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Of all the professions, the STEM fields are the least likely to discriminate against an individual because of gender — technical knowledge and expertise are completely gender neutral. Discrimination for a group because of gender necessarily implies discrimination against the complementary group. You need aid from someone who has a quality technical education to help you formulate your editorials in the future if you plan on opining on this topic with which you have no relevant experience.

David Griggs, Columbia

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