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Don't ignore Md.'s history - or anthem

If we ditch "Maryland, My Maryland" — an idea that's long overdue — what do we have to replace it? Baltimore musician Sean Tully has an idea.

The Sun's recent article covering a bill that would do away with “Maryland, My Maryland” as the state's official anthem appears to represent the latest unmerited example of history being deleted in the name political correctness. The article, meanwhile, failed to include key historical context and circumstances relative to the song (“Senators pass bill stripping ‘Maryland, My Maryland’ of ‘official’ status,” March 16).

Importantly, the state’s General Assembly did not adopt “Maryland, My Maryland” as the state song until 1939 — nearly eight decades after its composition and the same year it was scored in 1939 classic film, “Gone With The Wind.” Thus, it was undoubtedly adopted well after its message had either relevance or was a topic of debate on appropriateness.

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Sung to the tune of the old Christmas favorite, “O Tannenbaum,” the Maryland state song was originally composed as a poem by James Ryder Randall of Baltimore in 1861. The song was written for a Union state (Maryland) and became the anthem of that state.

In conclusion, I am inclined to agree with Senate Minority Leader J.B. Jennings who recently stated that, "if we have issues with the song, then let’s change the lyrics."

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Mike Maloney, Crofton

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