Baltimore youth work for tips washing car windshields. Known as a "squeegee kid," TF walks between cars stopped for the red light at the I-83 exit at North Avenue to offer their services. City officials and non-profit partners are trying to work on a new, more holistic approach to help the "squeegee people" to move from the street into other jobs.
Baltimore youth work for tips washing car windshields. Known as a "squeegee kid," TF walks between cars stopped for the red light at the I-83 exit at North Avenue to offer their services. City officials and non-profit partners are trying to work on a new, more holistic approach to help the "squeegee people" to move from the street into other jobs. (Kenneth K. Lam)

Since the squeegee kids are not moving and not going anywhere, or if a few do they will be immediately replaced, T. Rowe Price can consolidate their offices on their Owings Mills campus and the other companies can go to Canton Crossing, Owings Mills, Hunt Valley or other locations (“Baltimore needs a holistic approach toward squeegee boys,” Sept. 17).

Harvey Schwartz, Baltimore

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