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Sports wagering a good bet for schools? Not really | READER COMMENTARY

In this March 8, 2019 photo, a clerk counts money wagered by a customer at the sports betting lounge at the Tropicana casino in Atlantic City N.J. On Sept. 14, 2020, New Jersey gambling regulators announced that New Jersey set a new national record for the amount wagered on sports in a single month in the U.S. with nearly $668 million bet on games. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
In this March 8, 2019 photo, a clerk counts money wagered by a customer at the sports betting lounge at the Tropicana casino in Atlantic City N.J. On Sept. 14, 2020, New Jersey gambling regulators announced that New Jersey set a new national record for the amount wagered on sports in a single month in the U.S. with nearly $668 million bet on games. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry) (Wayne Parry/AP)

Sometimes what is not said speaks far louder than what is. Del. Maggie McIntosh urges voters to vote “for” on statewide Question 2 authorizing sports betting and assures us that the money raised “will go toward public education” (“Maggie McIntosh: Maryland sports gambling revenue will go to schools,” Oct. 6). Of course, it will. Yet neither the law itself nor Delegate McIntosh’s earnest defense of it promises that these funds will actually increase school funding.

In the past, such dedicated revenue simply replaced current funds that were then allocated elsewhere, leaving school funding pretty much where it was before. If voters think expanded sports betting is a valid means of increasing overall state revenues, then by all means, vote for it. But for voters who see sports betting primarily as a way to increase school funding, an “against” vote will convey to legislators that we need stronger assurance of that outcome up front.

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Lorraine Rohlik, Jessup

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