Advertisement
Readers Respond

Want to lower traffic deaths? Get drivers to stop speeding | READER COMMENTARY

Recently, a letter writer suggested that to reduce traffic fatalities the state should consider using only clearly identifiable, highly visible police vehicles to catch speeders and stop using speed traps and unmarked cars (”Blame bike lanes and speed cameras for recent rise in traffic fatalities,” Sept. 16). Doing that would appear to be futile as people who break the driving laws would only slow down when seeing a highly visible police vehicle, then continue driving well over the limit soon after.

To facilitate enough officers to patrol the highways in the manner suggested would necessitate a substantial increase in law enforcement budgets. Taxpayers would not likely support spending a large amount of money on a policy doubtful to produce the desired result of less highway accidents.

Advertisement

So, how is the lawbreaking behavior changed? A significant deterrent, such as notably increased fines and other legal enforcement measures might cause drivers to reconsider their behavior. Certainly not by following what was written in the letter. It stated that a cause of accidents on the Baltimore Beltway is a driver traveling at the maximum allowable speed by law, 55 miles per hour, in the left lane, thus causing accidents as everyone behind that driver cuts in and out to get around them because they need to drive at the non-rush hour average speed of 75 mph {as stated in the article}.

Of course, the vast majority of people would agree it is never prudent to drive at 55 mph in the left lane on any beltway. Not because it is unlawful, because the person driving at 55 mph is not breaking any laws. Any accident would be caused when the “road rage” level of entitlement of a reckless driver with a primal desire to be in front steps on the gas pedal.

Advertisement

— David C. Hill, Forest Hill

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.


Advertisement