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Proposed Sparrows Point park may have a pollution problem | READER COMMENTARY

Aerial shot of the land Baltimore County is planning to develop as Sparrows Point Park with a 16,000-square-foot community center, a 10,000-square-foot playground and full-size turf athletic field. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun).
Aerial shot of the land Baltimore County is planning to develop as Sparrows Point Park with a 16,000-square-foot community center, a 10,000-square-foot playground and full-size turf athletic field. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun). (Kevin Richardson / Baltimore Sun)

If the purpose of good journalism is to provide information and to raise interest or questions then the recent article by The Sun’s Taylor Deville (”Baltimore County’s first park in six years will convert Sparrows Point brownfield into 15-acre green space,” April 6) and Bob Staab’s letter to the editor in response (”Olszewski’s fondness for public parks has been missing in Dundalk,” April 15) to same certainly hit the bull’s-eye.

As a longtime resident in Dundalk, I am always rooting for the potential addition and improvement of quality open space wherever it may exist. However, shouldn’t we all be somewhat troubled by the strong possibility of industrial contaminants on this “brownfield” site? Shouldn’t we all be concerned about the heavy industrialized traffic in this vicinity with the exhaust fumes and poor air quality? Would you want to spend time at this site, on which we will be encouraging our children to play?

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According to information provided by Baltimore County, over $660,000 has been spent to date on planning for this property that is not yet owned by the county. Seems like we are gambling a lot of taxpayer money for something that still awaits an environmental approval. Would anyone “bet” this amount of money on the next Preakness winner? The only way I would bet this amount would be if I was guaranteed the outcome before the race is completed.

Hopefully, we will not be gambling with our children’s health and our environmental agencies will not be pressured to provide a politically desired result as opposed to a sound professional objective assessment.

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Chas Scheidt, Dundalk

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