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Snow days a relic of the past | READER COMMENTARY

Music teacher Alison Lentz greets buses at Waverly Elementary School in Ellicott City on the first day of in-person classes Monday, March 1, 2021. (Dylan Slagle/Baltimore Sun Media).
Music teacher Alison Lentz greets buses at Waverly Elementary School in Ellicott City on the first day of in-person classes Monday, March 1, 2021. (Dylan Slagle/Baltimore Sun Media). (Dylan Slagle/Baltimore Sun Media)

I never realized that snow days play such an important role in our cultural heritage (”In defense of snow days,” Feb. 26).

As a student years ago, I looked upon them as necessary and perhaps enjoyed a day off. I have no “lasting memories” of snow days, and it’s doubtful other adults do as well.

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Free public education became compulsory not so long ago. We should consider it a privilege. Throughout history, education was province only for the wealthy and privileged. We should be grateful for what we have and not lust for time off due to weather.

Most workers have no “snow days.” Unless it is a serious emergency, everyone is expected to show up. Also, adults never get spring breaks, multiple days off for Thanksgiving or the Christmas holidays. And summer vacation is nonexistent.

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I’m sorry parents and children bemoan the loss of snow days due to digital learning, but that’s life. The sooner kids understand, the better they’ll be able to adjust when it comes time to earn a living.

Roz Ellis, Baltimore

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