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Snow days still have their place | READER COMMENTARY

Noah Vogel, 8, of Eldersburg, zips down the slope at Carrolltowne Elementary School in Sykesville last month. The rise of on-line instruction has raised questions about whether school should ever be cancelled by weather in the future. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun).
Noah Vogel, 8, of Eldersburg, zips down the slope at Carrolltowne Elementary School in Sykesville last month. The rise of on-line instruction has raised questions about whether school should ever be cancelled by weather in the future. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun). (Amy Davis)

Kudos to Kelly Keane for defending snow days and how refreshing that her opinion is based on her knowledge of using integrating technology in education (”In defense of snow days,” Feb. 26). I have fond memories, as a mother of two sons who grew up in the 1990s, of our snow days.

As a former teacher, I couldn’t agree more that time away from screens in unstructured play is desperately needed by children. It often seems to me that developmentally appropriate learning has gotten lost in the shuffle of virtual learning, along with the importance of the children’s physical health. Ms. Keane hits the mark with three statements from her commentary, which really sum it up.

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They are: “We now have the tools and technology to learn and work from anywhere, but does that mean we should?” “[W]e’re already seeing the detrimental impact of kids being glued to their screens.” And, finally, “Just because we have the tools doesn’t mean we’re obligated to use them.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself. Rescue the snow day!

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Anne Groth, Tuscon, Arizona

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