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U.S. lacks the universal health care it deserves

Trump blasts Congress over collapse of health care bill. CBS Miami's Seth Lemon reports from Washington, D.C.

Dan Rodricks' excellent column, "Ten years since 'Sicko,' still seeking a cure" (July 11), provides a wonderful perspective on the progress — and lack thereof — that our nation has made in making health care available to the citizenry. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, 20 million Americans have acquired health care, including 750,000 in Maryland alone. Of course, millions still lack affordable health coverage, and if the Republican Party succeeds in gutting the Medicaid program, many newly-insured will lose their coverage.

When he quotes the late British Labor Party figure Tony Benn, Mr. Rodricks emphasizes the importance of an informed electorate for actualizing a first class health care system. In this context, some readers of Mr. Rodricks' article may discount his assertions because of their dislike of "Sicko" director Michael Moore's flamboyant and confrontational style. If so, they should stream the 2008 PBS Frontline documentary, "Sick Around The World." This dispassionate film illustrates how five capitalist democracies, Switzerland, Japan, Germany, Taiwan and the United Kingdom, deliver health care. By comparison, it demonstrates why our own health care system continues to rank lowest among the industrialized nations. And despite our devotion to American exceptionalism, it makes a convincing case that not all good ideas must originate here.

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Joe Garonzik, Baltimore

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