xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Sick leave reveals the difference between Olszewski and Brochin

Democrat John Olszewski, Jr. announces his intent to run for the open Baltimore County Executive seat. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

Johnny Olszewski has long recognized that hardworking Marylanders should not have to choose between the paycheck that keeps food on the table and caring for a loved one who is ill. When he was a delegate, Mr. Olszewski was the original sponsor in 2013 of legislation that would enable Marylanders to earn paid sick leave. He was on the cutting edge — at the time, only one state and the District of Columbia had similar laws. As is often the case in Annapolis, this important measure took several years to succeed, and in 2017, the Maryland General Assembly finally passed the Healthy Working Families Act, the bill first introduced by Delegate Olszewski.

When Gov. Larry Hogan vetoed the law last May, legislators returned to Annapolis and reaffirmed their commitment to enable hardworking Marylanders to earn sick leave by overriding that veto. Now, thanks to Mr. Olszewski’s bold vision, nearly 700,000 Marylanders have the ability to earn paid sick leave to care for themselves, a child or an elderly parent when they are sick. Sen. Jim Brochin, meanwhile, was working to undermine the bill at every turn. In 2017, when the bill reached the Senate floor, Senator Brochin fought against Maryland's working families and for amendments that would have undermined the bill. When his efforts to amend the bill failed, Mr. Brochin rejected the will of 83 percent of Marylanders who supported paid sick leave and voted against it.

Advertisement

In 2018, when other Democrats united to override Governor Hogan's veto, Senator Brochin again turned his back on hardworking Marylanders. His actions made clear that his priorities are not those of Maryland's families. Mr. Olszewski was a champion for earned sick leave before it was popular — when it was simply the right thing to do. Senator Brochin stood in the way (“A look at Jim Brochin’s radio ad in Baltimore County executive race,” May 18).

The third candidate running for Baltimore County Executive, County Councilwoman Vicki Almond was silent on this issue until the day before the override vote when she submitted written testimony to the Maryland Senate. When it comes to policies that support working families, Mr. Olszewski is the only proven leader for Baltimore County.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Dori Henry, Rodgers Forge

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement