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Mayor Scott sets a higher ethical example | READER COMMENTARY

So, within three days we see two much maligned Baltimore institutions passing each other going in the opposite directions on the highway of ethical behavior and public accountability.

On Monday, The Baltimore Sun reported that the Archdiocese of Baltimore was helping to defray the legal costs associated with the suit brought by anonymous plaintiffs hoping to keep secret proceedings involving the four-year long, taxpayer-funded report by the Maryland Attorney General’s Office into the decades of systemic, predatory sexual abuse of children by individuals within the Archdiocese and elsewhere in Maryland. This, after the Archdiocese promised solemnly to not oppose the report’s release. For shame.

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On Wednesday, Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott vetoed the fast-tracked City Council-approved change in Baltimore’s pension law to make current council members (and the current mayor) eligible for pensions after8 years of service, rather than the current 12 years (“Baltimore mayor vetoes bill that would make city officials pension-eligible after 8 years instead of 12,” Nov. 30). This was a clear money grab that horrified the city’s ethics watchdogs and citizenry. But, by golly, Mayor Scott did the right thing and, at least for now, restored some faith in city governance and accountability. Good man.

Now, I don’t know if Archbishop William Lori or Mayor Brandon Scott are going to get into Heaven. I, frankly, have my doubts. But, I do know that the mayor would be far in front of the archbishop if I were Saint Peter at the pearly gates. It’s nice to have at least one of the city’s institutions earning some public trust.

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— Jon Ketzner, Baltimore

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