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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan at an event in Frederick last September. Recent conflicts over local school spending (and possible tax increases) in suburban counties raise questions about the proper level of state education funding.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan at an event in Frederick last September. Recent conflicts over local school spending (and possible tax increases) in suburban counties raise questions about the proper level of state education funding. (Katherine Frey / The Washington Post)

Sorry, Baltimore Sun, your editorial, “School budget woes hit the suburbs; how will Hogan respond?” (Feb. 19), has a major flaw. Maryland is already a very high tax state and there is not unlimited money that Gov. Larry Hogan can make magically appear to give to schools. Even though Governor Hogan is a devout believer in the importance of good schools, there is only so much that he can do in raising taxes before they become onerous.

Your assumption that massive increases in school funding will create world-class schools is also false. It takes far more than money to provide the highest level of knowledge, which is the crux of why poverty cripples students long before they ever get to school.

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Short of providing 365 day a year residential care and schooling for the children and their parents, the vicious cycle of poverty will not be quenched. Hungry kids that fear the next calamity that will attack their family understandably do poorly in school as survival has a much higher priority today than achieving a world class education tomorrow.

Dan Crumpler

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