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This country has unrealistic expectations for schools | READER COMMENTARY

Dominic Wright, 8, works on his math on a Chromebook in his Westmont home on Thursday, April 16, 2020. COVID-19, coronavirus The state legislature last year approved the option for districts to do E-Learning — and for it to count as a school day — so students could transition to online classes when schools were closed. But fewer than one in four Illinois districts had plans approved that would allow them to move school online before it was clear the global COVID-19 pandemic would shut school buildings, the analysis found. All schools in Illinois were ordered closed through at least April 30 and must now have a plan for “remote learning,� which could include online learning. Some school districts were ready, though, having tested and tried doing school virtually already. One of those districts is Maercker 60, which transitioned with relative ease to an all-online school day. (Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune)
Dominic Wright, 8, works on his math on a Chromebook in his Westmont home on Thursday, April 16, 2020. COVID-19, coronavirus The state legislature last year approved the option for districts to do E-Learning — and for it to count as a school day — so students could transition to online classes when schools were closed. But fewer than one in four Illinois districts had plans approved that would allow them to move school online before it was clear the global COVID-19 pandemic would shut school buildings, the analysis found. All schools in Illinois were ordered closed through at least April 30 and must now have a plan for “remote learning,� which could include online learning. Some school districts were ready, though, having tested and tried doing school virtually already. One of those districts is Maercker 60, which transitioned with relative ease to an all-online school day. (Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune) (Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune)

Don’t you wish that “Big Education” would demand the same level of performance from itself as it does from the rest of society who pay dearly for it? Schools cannot be, and should not be, guaranteed perfect protection from COVID-19 (”Many public health experts say children should return to school in the fall, particularly in states like Maryland,” July 17) any more than they can, or should be, required to provide a perfect education for all students.

“Perfection is the enemy of the good” — Voltaire

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Dave Reich, Perry Hall

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