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Neglecting a child’s education should have consequences | READER COMMENTARY

Lionel F. Jackson Jr., principal of Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts, observes student artwork at the Baltimore school, one of seven city schools targeted for turnaround efforts under a federal school improvement program in 2019. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun).
Lionel F. Jackson Jr., principal of Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts, observes student artwork at the Baltimore school, one of seven city schools targeted for turnaround efforts under a federal school improvement program in 2019. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun). (Kenneth K. Lam, Baltimore Sun)

With the recent news that a young man got through four years of high school with passing only three classes and being absent many, many days, much discussion is in the air about what should be done (”Baltimore City school system says grading irregularities were found at Augusta Fells Savage Institute in 2019,” March 9).

I believe that this decision must be linked to a truthful picture of what happened. It should not be a picture only gathered by the teachers unions, the government administration, the school board or the school system. It needs to a fair and open discussion by those who paid for this person’s education. Most of the money for Baltimore comes from the state and that means from every citizen.

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I believe that the discussion must start with some facts. Fact one: The state constitution guarantees every child a free education. Fact Two: Education is not passing someone on without regard to what they learned or did not learn. Education at its most basic requires giving the student the tools to be a working citizen of the state with at least a reading and comprehension level of the last grade they passed. Fact three: The student should be able to have skills to get a job in accord with their level of education. Graduating from high school, the person should be able to gather facts themselves and arrange them in reasoned conclusions. They should be able and willing to work and care with others and for others.

If these basic goals are not fulfilled, the student and parents should be able to sue the school system, government leadership, the school board members, teachers unions, etc. for educational abuse. Teachers and administrators consider themselves to be professionals. They should be held to the same standard as religious leaders and parents for such abuse!

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Michael T. Buttner, Bel Air

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