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Baltimore can do better than to dust off Red Line | READER COMMENTARY

Gov. Larry Hogan canceled the Red Line after the city's unrest in 2015, along with its promise of jobs and development. (Maryland Transit Administration handout).
Gov. Larry Hogan canceled the Red Line after the city's unrest in 2015, along with its promise of jobs and development. (Maryland Transit Administration handout). (Baltimore Sun Graphic)

The Red Line as planned had serious problems, something even it’s greatest boosters will acknowledge (”Odds of Red Line resurrection slim in Baltimore, but upgrading east-west city transit is an achievable goal,” Aug. 2). The service offered would be a modest improvement compared to existing bus lines. The “spoke” model of radial transit lines may also no longer be the best fit for Baltimore and not only because of remote workers.

According to the Maryland Department of Labor, nearly 40% of Baltimore City residents commute to Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties for work. Folks who opposed the project in Southeast Baltimore were not worried about getting downtown, they were worried about getting on the highway to a suburban office park.

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New federal dollars should provide us an opportunity to start fresh, move on from the Red Line, and build something better. We could expand or improve bus services, per the Sun’s suggestion. Or we could build the Red Line and extend it to capture more of the Baltimore metro area — Columbia to Havre de Grace rather than Woodlawn to Bayview.

In any case, the last thing we should do is dust off a discarded near-30-year-old plan out of convenience.

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Teddy Walsh, Baltimore

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