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Reviving Red Line should be Baltimore’s top transit priority | READER COMMENTARY

Many Black families were displaced in the 1970s so that a sunken, 1.2-mile section of U.S. 40, often called the "Highway to Nowhere" could be built through the middle of West Baltimore. File. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun).

I read with interest the editorial on the difference between how transit projects are received in the Washington D.C. and Baltimore metropolitan areas (”Silver and Red: Can Baltimore ever catch up with D.C. on public transit?” Nov. 17). As an avid fan of public transit, I see no reason to build a light rail line in Timonium down York Road when the Red Line still has not been built. As a transit user there is nowhere in Timonium, Cockeysville or Lutherville on the appalling York Road leapfrogged zoning strip that I have ever been or would want to go. There is no future there.

Let these suburban bullies, who were booing proponents of public transit, have the transit desert that is suburban Baltimore County. On the other hand, a Red Line incorporating the “Highway to Nowhere” between downtown and the Social Security Administration offers job possibilities for many city residents.

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In both cases, you can give the residents what they want. Until the Red Line is up and running, the Highway To Nowhere should be immediately closed to all vehicle traffic except for free transit buses. That would express something better than mere words in the way of a public apology for decades of destroying a Black urban neighborhood while the State Highway Administration was force feeding Timonium and Towson with dreary asphalt.

— Paul R. Schlitz Jr., Baltimore

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