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Former mayor’s account of Governor Hogan’s disdain is accurate | READER COMMENTARY

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (L) and U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) (R) sign a poster during a news conference in front of the burned CVS in the Sandtown neighborhood on May 7, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Community leaders joined the mayor to kick off the One Baltimore campaign, a public-private initiative to support efforts to rebuild communities and neighborhoods after the riot that was caused by the death of Freddie Gray.
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (L) and U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) (R) sign a poster during a news conference in front of the burned CVS in the Sandtown neighborhood on May 7, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Community leaders joined the mayor to kick off the One Baltimore campaign, a public-private initiative to support efforts to rebuild communities and neighborhoods after the riot that was caused by the death of Freddie Gray. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

Former Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s op-ed (“Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: Hogan is no hero,” July 20) is an honest, insightful account of the governor’s disdain for Baltimore — the largest city in his state. Beginning with his cancellation of the Red Line and continuing with his elimination of the State Center project, the governor has remained an obstacle to the progress of Baltimore City and its proud, diverse, hardworking citizens.

As the owner of a small downtown family business, I am well aware of the challenges — many doled out by Gov. Hogan — that Mayor Rawlings-Blake faced during her tenure. I have long admired her dignity and fortitude, and I applaud her for calling out a governor whose “venom is sprayed to besmirch our community in a vain attempt to raise his political profile.”

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Alan J. Fink, Baltimore

The writer was a Johns Hopkins Mayoral Fellow from 1975 to 1977.

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