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Rail safety requires more than empty promises of technical fixes | READER COMMENTARY

Overturned Norfolk Southern rail cars, above, are strewn along the ground in Graniteville, S.C., in January 2005. Nine people died and more than 250 were sickened after a freight train carrying toxic chlorine crashed into a parked locomotive. Human error caused the accident.
Overturned Norfolk Southern rail cars, above, are strewn along the ground in Graniteville, S.C., in January 2005. Nine people died and more than 250 were sickened after a freight train carrying toxic chlorine crashed into a parked locomotive. Human error caused the accident.

One hopes the American people are tired of and see behind the unctuous confidences expressed about the safety of one-person rail crews expressed by Michael Rush in his recent letter to the editor (“Two-person rail crews should be a relic of the past,” Jan. 27).

Let’s see, recently to save the company dollars, The Boeing Company, expressing similar confidences regarding its aircraft, actually hid software workings from pilots on its new airplane. The resulting crashes killed 346 people.

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Will we have to wait until rail tragedy strikes to put safety before dollars on railroads?

Bob Kambic, Baltimore

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The writer is a visiting scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School Division of Health Sciences Informatics.

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