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Lower property taxes for city workers is great but how about the rest of us?

Baltimore City Hall
Baltimore City Hall (Jeffrey F. Bill, Baltimore Sun)

In a city plagued by poverty and violence it is nice to see Councilman Ryan Dorsey take leadership in the reduction of the property taxes (“Baltimore City Council to consider giving property tax credit to lowest-paid city workers,” Dec. 16). A $2,500 annual tax credit for certain city employees to will no doubt provide incentive to those folks to purchase a home by reducing their expenses by over $200 per month.

However, if the councilman is serious about incentives for home ownership and greater access to quality affordable housing, he needs to set his goals higher for an across-the-board real property tax reduction in the city of Baltimore. It is no secret that Baltimore’s tax rate is double that of its surrounding counties with at minimum a perception of inferior services. This is a barrier not only to home ownership, but also to new construction and preservation of quality affordable rental housing.

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The council has access to some of the top economists and real estate developers in the country right here in Baltimore. It’s about time they start working together to find a real long term real estate tax solution to spark investment in our city. We need transformation leadership, not Band-Aids and political headlines.

Matt Daddio, Baltimore

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