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Under the Dershowitz doctrine, Trump can do as he likes at any time | READER COMMENTARY

The Dershowitz Doctrine explained.
The Dershowitz Doctrine explained. (Bill Bramhall)

How awkward it must have been for President Donald Trump to have to engineer a scheme as complex as (a) removing an ambassador (“Take her out”), then (b) impounding military assistance to an ally, then (c) strong-arming that ally to smear a rival, and then (d) covering up incriminating evidence (“Final arguments in Trump impeachment trial aimed at voters, history,” Feb. 3).

Fortunately, this is all behind us now forever thanks to the legal arguments successfully argued before the U.S. Senate. In future, the president merely has to believe that his victory is in the national interest (the Alan Dershowitz Doctrine), then he can assassinate his rival(s) and refuse to release relevant documents and witnesses, per recently established precedent.

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If the president is squeamish about killing his rivals, he can always ask a foreign power to do the dirty work, since it is no longer considered improper to invite foreign involvement in our elections.

Stephen Warres, Pikesville

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