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Don’t idealize U.S. Postal Service employees | READER COMMENTARY

Postal workers load their mail delivery vehicles at the Panorama City post office in Los Angeles, Calif. on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy recently announced he would "suspend" certain initiatives that critics feared would slow delivery and disrupt the return of mail-in election ballots until after the Nov. 3 general election "to avoid even the appearance of impact on election mail." (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
Postal workers load their mail delivery vehicles at the Panorama City post office in Los Angeles, Calif. on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy recently announced he would "suspend" certain initiatives that critics feared would slow delivery and disrupt the return of mail-in election ballots until after the Nov. 3 general election "to avoid even the appearance of impact on election mail." (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) (Richard Vogel/AP)

I have read and listened to people sing the praises of the U.S. Postal Service for too long (”Maryland among states suing Postal Service over election concerns as postmaster general suspends some cost-cutting moves,” Aug. 18). I would like to relate some experiences that I have had with the USPS.

The letter carrier for my mother-in-law’s neighborhood lived in the house directly across the street from her. When the letter carrier bought the house, it was in need of a great deal of repair work. Every day, the letter carrier would work very hard and efficiently so that he was done delivering his route by lunchtime. He would then park his truck somewhere along his route and walk home. Once home, he would do repairs on his house. At the end of his work shift, he would put his USPS uniform back on, return to his truck, and go back to the post office and clock out. He did this for several years until the work was completed on his house.

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All of the neighbors who were home during the day saw what he did, but he was a nice enough person and he always made sure that everyone got their mail so no one complained. At my home, there have been at least three occasions where I was looking out the window when I saw the letter carrier drive up to my mailbox, put the mail in and drive off. When I went out to retrieve my mail, I found a slip of paper from the letter carrier saying that they had tried to deliver a package to my house but nobody answered the door. This after I stood looking out my window and saw the letter carrier come and go.

Hardly a week goes by that I do not get some mail for one of my neighbors, be it a letter or someone’s prescription medicine. I’m nice enough to deliver it to the correct address. I realize that not every USPS employee does the type of things that I have witnessed but I would be willing to bet that these are not unique instances.

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Melvin Lindsay, Baltimore

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