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Surveillance plane won't solve problems

A new effort is afoot to resurrect the Baltimore police surveillance plane by recasting it as a tool to fight corrupt cops. Archie Williams is among those leading the charge to put the spy plane back in the air. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun video)

The double-speak that is Persistent Surveillance System's "rebranding" of their aerial surveillance program and The Sun's biased article in favor of it are despicable (“Why should we trust Baltimore police with aerial surveillance technology?” Feb. 26). To anybody whose interest is piqued by PSS's "turn the cameras" argument, our society is already full of tools that ostensibly hold the police and the public equally accountable to the law.

Yet how often have those tools, like body cameras and the law itself, been exploited to protect police interests and abuse citizens? There is a reason that the Baltimore City Police Department and Persistent Surveillance System employed murky, unaccountable channels to secretly launch this program in the first place. If you want to hold police accountable, stop giving them more tools to abuse and start reevaluating and revoking the systems of power that enable their abuse.

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Christopher Warman, Baltimore

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