The record July rainfall has washed millions of gallons of sewage and other pollution into the Chesapeake Bay, raising concerns of a setback in cleaning up the estuary.

As a central Pennsylvania resident, I view comments critical of Pennsylvanian’s pollution control efforts by Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and Comptroller Peter Franchot following recent flooding as both insensitive and inflammatory rhetoric that holds no place in today’s management of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement (“Maryland governor: Pennsylvania, New York need to “take responsibility’ for surge of debris in bay,” Aug. 1). First and foremost, many of us central Pennsylvania residents have reached into our pockets as taxpayers and ratepayers to completely rebuild our water pollution control systems.

This has been and continues to be a significant recurring cost to me and my family members well as thousands of other central Pennsylvania families. Secondly, to make such comments after what can only be described as an act of God with the recent flooding and loss of life here in Pennsylvania borders on insanity. How could any of us prevent what Mother Nature had intended in the latter part of July of this year? I can only conclude that both of these politicians are attempting to grandstand to certain Maryland audiences at the expense of Pennsylvanians, and we will have none of it!

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It is time to recognize that it is getting extremely expensive for those us in Pennsylvania to provide for the needs of Chesapeake Bay residents, despite the provisions of the Clean Water Act and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. I wish Pennsylvania Environmental Secretary Patrick McDonnell success in taking on these two characters.

Robert N. Grant, Mechanicsburg, Pa.

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