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Shouldn’t statue have gotten public input earlier? | READER COMMENTARY

Jonathan Borofsky's "Male/Female" statue surveys luggage at Baltimore's Penn Station. The public art piece has proven to be a divisive landmark since it was installed in 2004. (Gabriella Demczuk/Baltimore Sun).
Jonathan Borofsky's "Male/Female" statue surveys luggage at Baltimore's Penn Station. The public art piece has proven to be a divisive landmark since it was installed in 2004. (Gabriella Demczuk/Baltimore Sun). (Gabriella Demczuk, Baltmore Sun photo)

I have a question regarding the recent editorial in The Baltimore Sun regarding who should decide the placement of the ‘Male/Female’ statue (”Who should decide the fate of Baltimore’s oft-reviled 51-foot-tall, ‘Male/Female’ statue?” June 8).

What if the issue about deciding the fate of the statue rising up above Penn Station had first been brought up to taxpayers before its installation by artist Jonathan Borofsky? What if taxpayers had been told, “We are installing a statue in front of Penn Station,” and he showed them a rendering and then further told them, “Oh, we should mention it only costs three-quarters of a million dollars, and you get to pay for it”? Would it have been erected?

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Just wondering.

Patrick Francis, Baltimore

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