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My kingdom for a mask: Must Trump invite a second wave? | READER COMMENTARY

In this May 14, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks after exiting Air Force One at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Allentown, Pa. From the U.S. president to the British prime minister's top aide and far beyond, leading officials around the world are refusing to wear masks or breaking confinement rules meant to protect their populations from the coronavirus and slow the pandemic. While some are punished when they're caught, or publicly repent, others shrug off the violations as if the rules don't apply to them. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
In this May 14, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks after exiting Air Force One at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Allentown, Pa. From the U.S. president to the British prime minister's top aide and far beyond, leading officials around the world are refusing to wear masks or breaking confinement rules meant to protect their populations from the coronavirus and slow the pandemic. While some are punished when they're caught, or publicly repent, others shrug off the violations as if the rules don't apply to them. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) (Evan Vucci/AP)

I am no fan of President Donald Trump, but right from the beginning of this pandemic, I have been rooting for his administration to do the right thing for our country. While we are now possibly at the beginning of a second wave that could be tamed by mask wearing, social distancing, hand sanitizers and hand washing, our president says nothing to encourage these good practices but, in fact, dismissed wearing a mask himself (”As coronavirus cases surge in several states, Trump administration steps up effort to play down the pandemic,” June 16). Thus, he perversely leads by disrespecting his own health officials guidelines with many people seeming to follow his example, possibly ushering in a second wave much sooner than a fall prediction.

People’s physical heath and the economy’s fiscal health are intimately interwoven. To say “either/or” here is a dangerous fiction fed by wishful thinking, avoidance and/or denial.

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Christy Bergland, Baltimore

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