xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Technology is a powerful tool during the pandemic | READER COMMENTARY

In this Thursday, May 7, 2020 photo, an Indian man uses Aarogya Setu app on his mobile phone in New Delhi, India. As India enters an extended coronavirus lockdown, the government is fervently pursuing contact tracing to control infections. At the heart of the effort in the country of 1.3 billion people is a smartphone app that evaluates users’ infection risk based on location services such as Bluetooth and GPS. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
In this Thursday, May 7, 2020 photo, an Indian man uses Aarogya Setu app on his mobile phone in New Delhi, India. As India enters an extended coronavirus lockdown, the government is fervently pursuing contact tracing to control infections. At the heart of the effort in the country of 1.3 billion people is a smartphone app that evaluates users’ infection risk based on location services such as Bluetooth and GPS. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri) (Altaf Qadri/AP)

Placement of the article, “Apple, Google release pandemic app technology” (May 20), on page 4 of The Baltimore Sun indicates a lack of perspective regarding an opportunity to educate the public on how technology can and should be used to manage the pandemic. The conversation regarding the balance between privacy and the potential increase in social interaction by using devices that would determine a probability for individual exposure is woefully absent in the media.

Technology can and should be used as a powerful tool to supplement human efforts in contact tracing, even if it is a special device we carry now that we can discard in favor of privacy tomorrow. Everyone understands how smart phones have changed their lives. Adoption would follow if the public were engaged in a conversation that would serve to educate, stimulate and support the possibilities for using technology to help solve this problem.

Advertisement

We are currently managing this pandemic with techniques of centuries past. We can and certainly should do better.

Mark Longerbeam, Baltimore

Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement