A Baltimore police officer patrols a city street less than 24 hours after a shooting. File.
A Baltimore police officer patrols a city street less than 24 hours after a shooting. File. (Erin Kirkland, Baltimore Sun)

The Sun recently reported on exorbitant police overtime costs often incurred by highly-paid and sometimes poorly behaved officers (“Baltimore’s highest-paid city employee is police sergeant charged with assaulting bystander,” Oct. 7). Last month, in part due to Sgt. Ethan Newberg’s highly publicized actions, I wrote a commentary suggesting Baltimore invest some of these overtime dollars into a police cadet high school so that we can build and extensively train our own police force while providing a few hundred city kids a year a clear path to a professional career (“A solution to Baltimore’s crime: police cadet high school,” Aug. 20).

I received feedback from many city stakeholders (including several within the law enforcement community) curious about the concept — with the two notable exceptions being the offices of the Baltimore police commissioner and the city’s mayor. I’ve heard both Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young and Police Commissioner Michael Harrison speak publicly about how they are open to all new ideas for police recruitment and improved policing results. Redirecting overtime resources from already highly-compensated police to build an annual pipeline of a new generation of well-trained, Baltimore-rooted, less expensive resources would at least seem an avenue worthy of a closer look.

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Mr. Mayor? Mr. Commissioner?

Gregg Nass, Baltimore

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