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Obituaries should carry more recent photographs of the deceased | READER COMMENTARY

A veteran walks through hundreds of tombstones at the Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood, Illinois. File. (John Smierciak/Chicago Tribune).
A veteran walks through hundreds of tombstones at the Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood, Illinois. File. (John Smierciak/Chicago Tribune). (John Smierciak, Daily Southtown)

I read the obituaries in The Sun daily and am constantly puzzled (”Robert Hatoff Sr., a former city firefighter whose career spanned nearly four decades, dies,” Dec. 17). Can I be the only one who looks at an accompanying photo and thinks to myself, how sad it is that someone so young has passed away only to find that the individual is actually in their 80s, 90s or even older?

I can’t imagine that the person’s current friends would remember what the deceased looked like in high school or in the military. When I see a photo of someone who doesn’t look familiar, I tend to skip over reading the rest of the write-up. I can’t begin to imagine how many acquaintances’ deaths I’ve missed over the years so please consider printing a more recent photo of the dearly departed.

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Paula Katz, Ellicott City

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