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Non-violent protesters deserve the spotlight over angry, destructive rioters | READER COMMENTARY

People including Kevin Antlitz, an Anglican priest, left, take a knee during a protest of the visit of President Donald Trump to the Saint John Paul II National Shrine, Tuesday, June 2, 2020, in Washington. Many demonstrators present said they were dismayed when Trump staged a visit to the historic St. John's Church across from the White House and held up a Bible after authorities had cleared the area of peaceful protesters. Protests continue over the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
People including Kevin Antlitz, an Anglican priest, left, take a knee during a protest of the visit of President Donald Trump to the Saint John Paul II National Shrine, Tuesday, June 2, 2020, in Washington. Many demonstrators present said they were dismayed when Trump staged a visit to the historic St. John's Church across from the White House and held up a Bible after authorities had cleared the area of peaceful protesters. Protests continue over the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

On Monday, June 1, Democratic strategist Michael Starr Hopkins made a comment on C-SPAN about people in the streets as a result of the criminal death of George Floyd. He stated that they are protesters and rioters.

These two groups are both angry as a consequence of long standing, deep seated injustices. Some are decades long for the living while other injustices have been experienced for centuries by blacks in America. They, and others who have at least some level of empathy, have a justified claim to be mad as hell and shout “something is wrong here!” However, there is a huge difference between peacefully demonstrating and the looting or burning of buildings. Sadly, more often than not, violence takes the headlines.

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Nonviolence can make a difference (“US cities erupt in more violence amid threats from President Trump to ‘dominate the streets,'” June 2). Gandhi lead India to freedom with using nonviolence resistance as his main focus. The words of a great American, Dr. Martin Luther King, are not just meant to be heard on the third Monday of each January. He said, “Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it.”

David C. Hill, Baltimore

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