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Removal of Eastern Shore editor from Hall of Fame deserved greater explanation | READER COMMENTARY

The Maryland-D.C.-Delaware Press Association inducted Edward J. Clarke, the longtime owner and editor of the Worcester Democrat newspaper, into its Hall of Fame in 1954. A recent review of his work found writings that were “viciously racist” and even promoted lynching leading to his ouster from that honor. (Handout/Tribune Content Agency).
The Maryland-D.C.-Delaware Press Association inducted Edward J. Clarke, the longtime owner and editor of the Worcester Democrat newspaper, into its Hall of Fame in 1954. A recent review of his work found writings that were “viciously racist” and even promoted lynching leading to his ouster from that honor. (Handout/Tribune Content Agency). (

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Removal of Edward Clark from the Maryland-D.C.-Delaware Press Association Hall of Fame may have been justified by evidence supporting that editor’s racism, but The Sun’s report fails to provide readers with that evidence (”Maryland newsman posthumously ousted from media hall of fame over ‘viciously racist’ coverage,” Nov. 11).

Instead, Mr. Clark’s descriptions of murder suspects are quoted as a “rabid dog,” a “disease-spreading germ” and “garbage” and deserving of “a good stout rope, a noose at one end.” How do we know that the Worcester County newsman wouldn’t have used the same terms for a murder suspect of any race?

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The article separately states that the suspects were Black men, so that readers are left to associate the epithets with one ethnic group and continuing racism in our time.

Robert E. Wenk, Baltimore

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