xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Prosecutorial discretion is not new. Just ask the rich and powerful | READER COMMENTARY

Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby holds a press conference outside the courthouse in downtown Baltimore on Friday, March 26, 2021. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun).
Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby holds a press conference outside the courthouse in downtown Baltimore on Friday, March 26, 2021. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun). (Ulysses Muñoz)

Letter writer Larry Williams is outraged that Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby is exercising prosecutorial discretion on low-level crimes. He says ignoring the law is unacceptable (”Mosby’s directive on low-level offenses goes too far,” April 21).

So where has he been all these decades the U.S. Department of Justice has been acting as if anti-trust law did not exist, as if banks had no obligation to follow the law, as if environmental crimes were of no account? The white-collar crimes of the past 30 years have harmed more people, more grievously than anything Ms. Mosby proposes to ignore, yet they are so seldom prosecuted that many people seem unaware they are even crimes.

Advertisement

Ignoring laws that would constrain the rich and powerful while enforcing those that harass the poor is the kind of behavior that breeds contempt for law. If the American “justice” system is going to have anything to do with justice, it is past time prosecutors at all levels started focusing more on crimes that do widespread harm.

Katharine W. Rylaarsdam, Baltimore

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement