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Ending misdemeanor arrests comes at a price | READER COMMENTARY

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, along with Mayor Brandon Scott, left, announce that hate crime charges have been brought against a Baltimore man accused of attacking Asian-American businesses earlier this year. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun).
Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, along with Mayor Brandon Scott, left, announce that hate crime charges have been brought against a Baltimore man accused of attacking Asian-American businesses earlier this year. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun). (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun)

Abandoning prosecution of misdemeanors comes with serious consequences (”Criminal justice reform has made Marilyn Mosby a lightning rod in Baltimore, but the prosecutor’s progressive policies are based on research,” July 20). In doing so, Baltimore Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby fails to protect victims’ rights and public safety and usurps the power of the legislative branch when she refuses to prosecute entire categories of crime while ignoring rising murder rates. Remember, there is a victim and a neighborhood, both of which have been diminished by the offense not charged. If you don’t arrest those who commit misdemeanors, it implies there should not be a law against misdemeanors. One commentator called the practice of refusing to prosecute low level crimes “like taking items off the menu.” Respecting the law by prosecuting low-level crimes serves law abiding citizens and victims, not criminals. That’s an item that should always be on the menu.

Steven Lasover, Towson

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